The Structure of Antagonism: A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology (2023)

Abstract

Recent initiatives in the empirically based classification of psychopathology, namely, the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP), have made significant strides in addressing the limitations of traditional taxonomies (i.e., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, International Classification of Diseases). The current study aimed to extend this work by helping to clarify the lower order structure of an understudied dimension of psychopathology—antagonism (i.e., HiTOP antagonistic externalizing spectrum)—a core feature of many externalizing disorders and related to important outcomes such as interpersonal problems, childhood conduct problems, and incarceration. We examined the hierarchical structure of several measures of antagonistic externalizing features across both self-report and clinical interview ratings for 2,279 community participants with a diverse range of personality pathology (~75% with a personality disorder) and antagonistic behaviors (~30% with intermittent explosive disorder). Exploratory structural equation modeling was used to account for the shared variance between variables within self-report and interview methods. Results revealed an optimal lower order structure consisting of six factors labeled Antisociality, Anger, Hostility, Narcissism, Mistrust, and Attention Seeking. Factor scores yielded expected relations with self-report and interview ratings of psychopathology, personality, and childhood trauma. Implications for future research in classification and treatment of psychopathology are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPersonality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Antagonism
  • Antagonistic externalizing spectrum
  • Exploratory structural equation modeling
  • Hierarchical taxonomy of psychopathology
  • Research domain criteria

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Calabrese, W. R., Lopez, M. M., Koenigsberg, H. W., New, A. S., Rosell, D. R., Hazlett, E. A., MCClure, M. M., & Perez-Rodriguez, M. M. (Accepted/In press). The Structure of Antagonism: A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. https://doi.org/10.1037/per0000603

Calabrese, William R. ; Lopez, Maria Martin ; Koenigsberg, Harold W. et al. / The Structure of Antagonism : A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology. In: Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. 2022.

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abstract = "Recent initiatives in the empirically based classification of psychopathology, namely, the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP), have made significant strides in addressing the limitations of traditional taxonomies (i.e., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, International Classification of Diseases). The current study aimed to extend this work by helping to clarify the lower order structure of an understudied dimension of psychopathology—antagonism (i.e., HiTOP antagonistic externalizing spectrum)—a core feature of many externalizing disorders and related to important outcomes such as interpersonal problems, childhood conduct problems, and incarceration. We examined the hierarchical structure of several measures of antagonistic externalizing features across both self-report and clinical interview ratings for 2,279 community participants with a diverse range of personality pathology (~75% with a personality disorder) and antagonistic behaviors (~30% with intermittent explosive disorder). Exploratory structural equation modeling was used to account for the shared variance between variables within self-report and interview methods. Results revealed an optimal lower order structure consisting of six factors labeled Antisociality, Anger, Hostility, Narcissism, Mistrust, and Attention Seeking. Factor scores yielded expected relations with self-report and interview ratings of psychopathology, personality, and childhood trauma. Implications for future research in classification and treatment of psychopathology are discussed.",

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(Video) Form follows function: An evolutionary model of the structure of psychopathology

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Calabrese, WR, Lopez, MM, Koenigsberg, HW, New, AS, Rosell, DR, Hazlett, EA, MCClure, MM & Perez-Rodriguez, MM 2022, 'The Structure of Antagonism: A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology', Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. https://doi.org/10.1037/per0000603

The Structure of Antagonism : A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology. / Calabrese, William R.; Lopez, Maria Martin; Koenigsberg, Harold W. et al.

In: Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 2022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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AU - New, Antonia S.

AU - Rosell, Daniel R.

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AU - MCClure, Margaret M.

AU - Perez-Rodriguez, Mercedes M.

N1 - Publisher Copyright:© 2022 American Psychological Association

PY - 2022

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N2 - Recent initiatives in the empirically based classification of psychopathology, namely, the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP), have made significant strides in addressing the limitations of traditional taxonomies (i.e., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, International Classification of Diseases). The current study aimed to extend this work by helping to clarify the lower order structure of an understudied dimension of psychopathology—antagonism (i.e., HiTOP antagonistic externalizing spectrum)—a core feature of many externalizing disorders and related to important outcomes such as interpersonal problems, childhood conduct problems, and incarceration. We examined the hierarchical structure of several measures of antagonistic externalizing features across both self-report and clinical interview ratings for 2,279 community participants with a diverse range of personality pathology (~75% with a personality disorder) and antagonistic behaviors (~30% with intermittent explosive disorder). Exploratory structural equation modeling was used to account for the shared variance between variables within self-report and interview methods. Results revealed an optimal lower order structure consisting of six factors labeled Antisociality, Anger, Hostility, Narcissism, Mistrust, and Attention Seeking. Factor scores yielded expected relations with self-report and interview ratings of psychopathology, personality, and childhood trauma. Implications for future research in classification and treatment of psychopathology are discussed.

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Calabrese WR, Lopez MM, Koenigsberg HW, New AS, Rosell DR, Hazlett EA et al. The Structure of Antagonism: A Hierarchical Model of Self and Interview-Rated Psychopathology. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. 2022. https://doi.org/10.1037/per0000603

(Video) 03 Lee Anna Clark, Ph D

FAQs

What is hierarchical taxonomy of psychopathology? ›

The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) is a data-driven, hierarchically based alternative to traditional classifications that conceptualizes psychopathology as a set of dimensions organized into increasingly broad, transdiagnostic spectra.

What are the models of psychopathology? ›

The four main models to explain psychological abnormality are the biological, behavioural, cognitive, and psychodynamic models. They all attempt to explain the causes and treatments for all psychological illnesses, and all from a different approach.

What are the three components of the three prong approach to diagnosing a psychological disorder? ›

Three-Pronged Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality Disorder and its Consequences: Personality Functioning, Pathological Traits, and Psychosocial Disability.

What is one of the five key personality dimensions of traits used to identify a personality disorder? ›

The five broad personality traits described by the theory are extraversion (also often spelled extroversion), agreeableness, openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism. The five basic personality traits is a theory developed in 1949 by D. W.

What is hierarchical theory example? ›

Hierarchy systems rank categories from top to bottom. For example, in a typical family system, the parents have the most authority, followed by the children, then followed by the pets.

What is the hierarchical model psychology? ›

a model of either within-person dynamics or individual differences in personality in which some psychological constructs are viewed as high-level variables that organize or govern the functioning of other lower level variables.

What are the 4 important personal components of psychopathology? ›

Thus, we can consider four important personal components in psychopathology (Table 1.1). These are a loss of freedom or ability to consider alternatives; a loss of genuine personal contact; a loss of connection with one's self and the ability to live in a productive manner; and, finally, personal distress.

What are the three main classes of psychopathology? ›

Some of the different types of psychopathology include, but are not limited to: Anxiety disorders. Bipolar disorders. Depressive disorders.

What are the 3 types of modeling in psychology? ›

Bandura identified three kinds of models: live, verbal, and symbolic. A live model demonstrates a behavior in person, as when Ben stood up on his surfboard so that Julian could see how he did it.

What are the 4 types of psychological assessment? ›

Psychological testing is divided into four primary types:

Clinical Interview. Assessment of Intellectual Functioning (IQ) Personality Assessment. Behavioral Assessment.

What is the most common Diagnostic system in psychopathology? ›

The DSM-5 is the classification system of psychological disorders preferred by most U.S. mental health professionals, and it is published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA).

What 3 components are considered in the definition of mental illness psychological disorder? ›

This definition includes three components (3 Ds) Dysfunction. Distress. Deviance.

What are the five factors which determine the personality of person according to 5 big factor theory? ›

The traits that constitute the five-factor model are extraversion, neuroticism, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

Why is the five-factor model important? ›

The Five Factor Model of personality can help curb counterproductive behavior. Employees deviate from acceptable workplace behavior when they engage in actions that harm the well-being of the individual or the organization.

What are the 5 factors in the Big 5 personality model and what do each of these factors mean? ›

Extraversion is sociability, agreeableness is kindness, openness is creativity and intrigue, conscientiousness is thoughtfulness, and neuroticism often involves sadness or emotional instability.

How do you explain hierarchical structure? ›

A hierarchical structure is typical for larger businesses and organisations. It relies on having different levels of authority with a chain of command connecting multiple management levels within the organisation. The decision-making process is typically formal and flows from the top down.

What is a hierarchical structure simple definition? ›

A hierarchical structure is an organisation structure that follows a chain-of-command from the top executives to regular employees. It resembles a pyramid, and the individual with the most authority occupies a sole senior-most position above the pyramid, while the junior-most workers occupy the positions at the bottom.

What are the types of hierarchy? ›

Two types of containment hierarchies are the subsumptive containment hierarchy and the compositional containment hierarchy. A subsumptive hierarchy "subsumes" its children, and a compositional hierarchy is "composed" of its children. A hierarchy can also be both subsumptive and compositional.

What is an example of a hierarchical relationship? ›

Types of hierarchical relationships include Genus/species (or class/class member), Whole/part, and Instance (or generic topic/proper name example).

Why hierarchical model is important? ›

Hierarchical models allow us to capture the shared latent structure underlying observations of multiple related concepts, processes, or systems – to abstract out the elements in common to the different sub-concepts, and to filter away uninteresting or irrelevant differences.

What is the hierarchical decision making process? ›

A hierarchy of decision processes in which lower levels integrate sensory evidence over short timescales, and higher levels interact with lower levels over longer timescales, quantitatively explains the behavior. Expected accuracy links these two levels and enables adaptive changes of decision strategy.

What is psychopathology explain with example? ›

Psychopathology is the study of mental and social disorders and is also referred to as mental illness. Psychopathology is used to describe the symptoms, behaviors, causes, development, and treatments of various mental health disorders.

What are the key concepts of psychopathology? ›

Psychopathology refers to the study of mental disorders in terms of their causes, development, course, classification, and treatment. Definitions of Abnormality: Statistical Infrequency, Deviation from Social Norms, Failure to Function Adequately, Deviation from Ideal Mental Health.

Which model best explains psychopathology? ›

Correct answer: Diathesis-stress model: a model dependent on the idea that psychological disorders occur when a person is predisposed to the disorder and experiences significant stress. Explanation: The major paradigm for dissociative disorders is the diathesis-stress model.

What are the two most commonly used classification systems for psychopathology? ›

Use of ICD and DSM. Many—perhaps most—psychopathology researchers use the DSM's specific, operational criteria, whereas those of the ICD-10 DCR were never widely adopted in research.

What is the importance of psychopathology? ›

Psychopathology enables the clinician to understand what it is like to have a mental disorder. It also enables the clinician to get a grasp of the global experience of the patient. In other words, the clinician will understand the 'lifeworld' of the patient.

Who uses psychopathology? ›

Traditionally, those suffering from mental disorders have usually been treated by the psychiatric profession, which adheres to the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2002) or ICD-10 (WHO, 1992) for classifying mental disorders. It therefore follows that psychiatrists use the term 'psychopathology' more than people in other professions.

What are the 4 stages of the process of Modelling? ›

The steps of the modeling process are as follows:
  • Analyze the problem. We must first study the situation sufficiently to identify the problem pre cisely and understand its fundamental questions clearly. ...
  • Formulate a model. ...
  • Solve the model. ...
  • Verify and interpret the model's solution. ...
  • Report on the model. ...
  • Maintain the model.

What are the 4 basic components of Behaviour Modelling? ›

Four steps are involved in the modeling of behavior, vis-à-vis: attention, retention, reproduction, and motivation.

What are the 4 models of human behavior? ›

Introduction To Models And Methods Of Understanding Human Behaviour. include: The Biological Model, The Psychoanalytic Model, The Behaviourist Model, The Cognitive-Behavioural Model, and The Humanistic Model.

What is hierarchical taxonomy? ›

Hierarchical taxonomy is a structure in which the taxons are organized hierarchically. Each taxon could have one parent taxon and unlimited number of child taxa. Sitefinity CMS provides API for working with hierarchical taxonomies.

What is the hierarchical system of taxonomy? ›

The current taxonomic system now has eight levels in its hierarchy, from lowest to highest, they are: species, genus, family, order, class, phylum, kingdom, domain. Thus species are grouped within genera, genera are grouped within families, families are grouped within orders, and so on (Figure 1).

What is the hierarchical order of taxonomy? ›

The most famous taxonomy, the Linnaean taxonomy of organisms, has well-known names for each of its hierarchical levels: Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species.

What is the meaning of hierarchical classification? ›

Hierarchical classification is a system of grouping things according to a hierarchy, or levels and orders. Plants can be classified as phylogenetics (how they look), environmental (where they grow), agricultural (what they are used for), or morpholofical (how their structure compares to each other).

How do you explain hierarchical structure? ›

A hierarchical structure is typical for larger businesses and organisations. It relies on having different levels of authority with a chain of command connecting multiple management levels within the organisation. The decision-making process is typically formal and flows from the top down.

What is a hierarchical structure simple definition? ›

A hierarchical structure is an organisation structure that follows a chain-of-command from the top executives to regular employees. It resembles a pyramid, and the individual with the most authority occupies a sole senior-most position above the pyramid, while the junior-most workers occupy the positions at the bottom.

What is the importance of hierarchical classification? ›

Well, it helps us categorize organisms so we can more easily communicate biological information. Taxonomy uses hierarchical classification as a way to help scientists understand and organize the diversity of life on our planet. Hierarchical classification basically means that we classify groups within larger groups.

What are the characteristics of hierarchical classification? ›

The three main characteristics used for a hierarchical classification are:
  • (i) Complexity of cell structure, i.e., type of cell—prokaryotic or eukaryotic. ...
  • (ii) Body organisation, i.e., whether the organism is unicellular or multicellular. ...
  • (iii) Mode of nutrition: ant otrophic or heterotrophic.

What is the correct order of the hierarchical classification from the highest to lowest? ›

1. Linnaeus' hierarchical system of classification includes seven levels called taxa. They are, from largest to smallest, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species.

What are the 8 hierarchical categories of classification? ›

The major ranks: domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species, applied to the red fox, Vulpes vulpes. The hierarchy of biological classification's eight major taxonomic ranks. Intermediate minor rankings are not shown.

Which is the smallest category in the hierarchical taxonomic system of classification? ›

Species is the smallest and least inclusive of the taxonomic categories.

What is called hierarchy of classification answer? ›

“Taxonomic hierarchy is the process of arranging various organisms into successive levels of the biological classification either in a decreasing or an increasing order from kingdom to species and vice versa.” Each of this level of the hierarchy is called the taxonomic category or rank.

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